Welder

Welders cut, shape and join sections of metal in a wide range of industries, such as construction and engineering, transport, aerospace, and offshore oil and gas. They also carry out repairs on manufacturing equipment and machinery. 

Career Outlook

As a welder, you would select and lay out materials to be cut or joined, follow engineering instructions and drawings, use the most suitable welding method for the job in hand, inspect and test cuts and joins, using precision measuring instruments such as a micrometer and operate semi-automatic spot-welding equipment.
You will also work with metals and alloys.  You may also cut and joint composite materials, such as plastics, using specialist welding methods.  Common types of welding include oxyacetylene, MIG (metal inert gas), MMA (manual metal arc) and TIG (tungsten inert gas).
You would usually wear protective clothing, such as face-shield, apron and gloves.

Essential Welder Skill Set
To be a welder you will need to have:
– Good hand-to-eye coordination
– The ability to work accurately
– Good concentration levels
– The ability to work without direct supervision
– The ability to understand technical plans and drawings
– Good maths skills to work out measurements
– The ability to solve problems
– An understanding of safe working practices.

Entry Requirements

It is assumed that candidates embarking on learning towards this qualification are in possession of a minimum:

Grade 12 with:
– Mathematics (not Maths Literacy)
– Physical Science
– Technical Drawing
– Mechanical Technology

OR

N2 Technical qualification with relevant subjects:
– Mathematics
– Engineering Science
– Engineering Drawing
– Welding Trade Theory

OR

– NCV Level 4
– Completed 7 subjects
– (50% or higher is required)

Course Outline

The course consists of the following modules:

INTRODUCTION TO THE WELDING TRADE
– Occupational profiles of welders
– Specialised welding related positions
– The welding apprentices and the trade test
– The work environment of a welder
– Occupational Safety, Health and Environmental

FABRICATE SIMPLE COMPONENTS
– Select and care for engineering hand tools
– Select and care for engineering power tools
– Engineering drawings

WELDING PROCESSES AND PRINCIPLES
– Welding schematics, calculations, welds and welded joints
– Weld imperfections
– Welding consumables classification and handling
– Metals and weldability of metals
– Fusion welding
– Welding codes, standards and parameters
– Shrinkage, residual stress and distortion

BASIC GAS WELDING, CUTTING AND COUGING
– Cutting and couging
– Gas welding and cutting

ARC WELDING PROCESS
– Arc welding
– Manual Metal Arc Welding Process

MIG WELDING PROCESS
– The Metal Inert Gas/Metal Active Gas/Flux Cored Arc Welding Process

TIG WELDING PROCESS
– The Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Process

QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCESS
– Welding inspection and Quality

Institutional Training

This program provides for delivery in a variety of modes, including:
– Self-paced delivery
– Classroom delivery
– Workplace experience
– Simulated workplace delivery
– Combined delivery with other related units

Learning Activities during Institutional Training
During the knowledge modules learners will be required to participate in various interactive activities, which were designed to equip them with the knowledge required. Some of the classroom learning activities may ask them to check their answers with their facilitator or to check them in the learning activities.
During the practical skills modules learners will be required to demonstrate that they can put their knowledge to practice by doing practical tasks in a well-equipped workshop and controlled learning environment. Progress will be monitored by the facilitator and eventually learners will be assessed against prescribed criteria to declare them competent against these practical modules.
Total duration of institutional training required for knowledge and practical skills modules is nine months. During these nine months we will focus on the assessment requirements they need to meet as well as the background knowledge required for successful welding skills.
Individual learning progress will allow learners to complete the training at their own paste depending on previous exposure to similar knowledge and experience.

Workplace Experience
During the workplace skills modules learners will be mentored and monitored in an accredited workplace under the supervision of a mentor or subject matter expert to ensure that he/she is able to apply welding skills.

Trade Test
Once all the above modules have been addressed, the learner will be able to apply for trade test at Durnacol Skills Hub.

Employer

Mining Companies
– Engineering Companies
– Manufacturing Companies
– Shipyards and Ships
– Oil Rigs
– Municipalities

Courses

DURNACOL Skills Hub - South Africa's Premier Independent National Technical Training Centre