Millwright

The work of the millwright is both mechanical and electrical. It involves dismantling, fault detection and repairing of, for example, electric motors, which the millwright will dismantle, and test, checking wiring and determining power output and consumption. The millwright also maintains, reconstructs and installs heavy machinery, electrically driven machines and electronic control gear. 

Career Outlook

Millwrights are highly skilled workers whose primary function is to install and maintain heavy machinery. When machinery arrives at the job site, it must be unloaded, inspected, and moved into position. For light machinery, millwrights use rigging and hoisting devices such as pulleys and cables to lift and position equipment. For heavier jobs, they are assisted by hydraulic lift-truck or crane operators. To decide what type of device is needed to position machin­ery, millwrights must know the load-bearing properties of ropes, cables, hoists, and cranes.

When installing machinery, millwrights fit bear­ings, align gears and wheels, attach motors, and connect belts according to the manufacturer’s instructions. They may use hand and power tools, cutting torches, welding machines, and soldering guns

Millwrights must be very precise in their work and have good mathematical skills to measure angles, mate­rial thicknesses, and small distances with tools such as squares, calipers, and micrometers. When a high level of precision is required, such as on a production line, lasers may be used for alignment. Once machinery is installed, millwrights may do repair or preventive maintenance work such as oiling and greasing parts and replacing worn components.

Millwrights may be hired to change the placement of existing machines in a plant or mill to set up a new pro­duction line or improve efficiency. Their contribution is key to the planning of complicated production processes. In large shops and plants, they may update machinery placement to improve the production process. They may even move and reassemble machinery each time a new production run starts. In smaller factories, however, machinery is rearranged only to increase production and improve efficiency. Millwrights consult with supervisors, planners, and engineers to determine the proper place­ment of equipment based on floor loads, workflow, safety measures, and other important concerns.

The increasing use of automation in many industries means that millwrights are responsible for installing and maintaining more sophisticated machines. When work­ing with this more complicated machinery, millwrights are assisted by computer or electronic experts, electri­cians, and manufacturers’ representatives.

Essential Millwright Skill Set
Color vision – Millwrights must identify electrical wires by color.
Critical-thinking skills – Millwrights perform tests and use the results to diagnose problems. For example, when an outlet is not working, they may use a multimeter to check the voltage, amperage, or resistance to determine the best course of action.
Physical stamina – Millwrights often need to move around all day while running wire and connecting fixtures to the wire.
Physical strength – Millwrights need to be strong enough to move heavy components, which may weigh up to 25 kilograms.
Troubleshooting skills – Millwrights find, diagnose, and repair problems. For example, if a motor stops working, they perform tests to determine the cause of its failure and then, depending on the results, fix or replace the motor.
Communication Skills – Communication and interpersonal skills also are needed for giving instructions and working in teams.
A high level of coordination and mechanical aptitude is necessary to read complicated diagrams and work with the machinery.

Entry Requirements

It is assumed that candidates embarking on learning towards this qualification are in possession of a minimum

Grade 12 with:
– Mathematics (not Maths Literacy)
– Physical Science
– Technical Drawing
– Electrical Technology/Mechanical Technology

OR

N2 Technical qualification with relevant subjects:
– Mathematics
– Engineering Science
– Industrial Electronics/Engineering Drawings
– 2 Trade Related Subjects

OR

– NCV Level 4
– Completed 7 subjects
– (50% or higher is required)

Course Outline

The course consists of the following modules:

THE MILLWRIGHTS WORLD OF WORK
– Introduction to the Millwright Trade
– Safety, health, environment, risk and quality principles in the workplace

ENGINEERING DRAWINGS
– Freehand drawing
– Code of practice for engineering drawing (symbols and abbreviations)
– Drawing instruments and equipment
– Dimensioning methods
– Isometric drawings
– Assembly and detailed drawings

ENGINEERING MATERIALS
– Basic metallurgy and heat concepts
– Properties of base metals, alloys and synthetic materials
– Non-ferrous metals and ferrous materials
– Metal specifications and testing

ENGINEERING TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Hand tools to hold, assemble or disassemble components
– Hand-held cutting tools
– Hand-held power tools
– Measurement tools and equipment
– Marking-off tools and equipment

BASIC LIFTING CONCEPTS
– Rigging (slings, block and tackle, chain block, steel ropes)
– Rigging concepts
– Loads selection and limitations

TYPES AND APPLICATIONS OF SCREW THREADS
– Terminology related to screw threads
– Screw threads
– Application of screw threads
– Thread calculations

TYPES AND FUNCTIONS OF LOCKING DEVICES AND FASTENERS
– Fasteners and locking devices
– Application of fasteners and locking devices
– Drawings of fasteners and locking devices

WELDING AND MATERIALS
– Arc welding and gas welding and cutting equipment and consumables
– Arc welding and gas welding and cutting techniques and principles
– Material selection
– Cutting and welding defects
– Safe handling of gas cylinders
– Health and safety risks and protective equipment and measures

SEALS, PUMPS, VALVES AND CONVEYORS
– Static and dynamic seals and gaskets
– Types and application of valves
– Types and application of pumps
– Types and functions of conveyors

MAINTAIN AND ALIGN DRIVES
– Drives (direct and indirect)
– Terminology of drives
– Functions and working principle of drives

GEARBOXES, BRAKES AND CLUTCHES
– Mechanical working principles, types and applications of gearboxes
– Mechanical working principles, types and applications of clutches
– Mechanical working principles, types and applications of brakes

LUBRICATION AND BEARINGS
– Mechanical working principles, types and applications of lubrication systems
– Types and application of bearings

PNEUMATICS AND HYDRAULICS
– Mechanical working principles, types and applications of hydraulic systems
– Mechanical working principles, types and applications of pneumatic system

DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES
– Diagnostic equipment
– Diagnostic techniques
– Diagnostic testing

TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT FOR ELECTRICAL WORK
– Hand tools and power tools
– Measuring and testing instruments

ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS
– Fundamentals of electricity
– Electronics
– Electrical principles of appliances
– Perform soldering activities

WIRE WAYS AND WIRING (INCLUDING SANS 10142-1)
– Wireways
– Wiring of installations
– Earthing and bonding

ROTATING ELECTRICAL MACHINERY
– Rotating electrical machinery – AC motors
– Rotating Electrical Machinery – DC motors
– Rotating electrical machinery – Alternators and Generators

ELECTRICAL SUPPLY SYSTEMS AND COMPONENTS
– Concepts, theories and principles of supply Systems
– Batteries
– Transformers
– Types of cables and applications
– Switchgear and control gear
– Lighting systems

LOW VOLTAGE PROTECTION
– Application of low voltage protection
– Types of low voltage protection
– Low voltage protection parameters and statutory requirements

FAULT FINDING
– Fault find and repair electrical control systems and electrical installations
– Faultfinding principles for electrical circuits
– Faultfinding techniques for electrical circuits

Institutional Training

This program provides for delivery in a variety of modes, including:
– Self-paced delivery
– Classroom delivery
– Workplace experience
– Simulated workplace delivery
– Combined delivery with other related units

Learning Activities during Institutional Training
During the knowledge modules learners will be required to participate in various interactive activities, which were designed to equip them with the knowledge required. Some of the classroom learning activities may ask them to check their answers with their facilitator or to check them in the learning activities.

During the practical skills modules learners will be required to demonstrate that they can put their knowledge to practice by doing practical tasks in a well-equipped workshop and controlled learning environment. Progress will be monitored by the facilitator and eventually learners will be assessed against prescribed criteria to declare them competent against these practical modules.
Total duration of institutional training required for knowledge and practical skills modules is twelve months. During these twelve months we will focus on the assessment requirements they need to meet as well as the background knowledge required for successful engineering skills.
Individual learning progress will allow learners to complete the training at their own paste depending on previous exposure to similar knowledge and experience.

Workplace Experience
During the workplace skills modules learners will be mentored and monitored in an accredited workplace under the supervision of a mentor or subject matter expert to ensure that he/she is able to fault find, dismantle, maintain and repair mechanical equipment.

Trade Test
Once all the above modules have been addressed, the learner will be able to apply for trade test at Durnacol Skills Hub.

Employer

Government departments
– Transportation services
– Municipalities
– Factories
– Mines
– Industries
– Private electrical businesses
– Companies such as Arcelor Mittal, Eskom and Sasol
– Self-employment

Courses

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